Survey Finds Muslims are Most Likely to Face Workplace Discrimination

The Public Religion Research Institute conducted a survey of more than 2,000 adults for the Tanenbaum Center. The survey focused on workplace discrimination and religious diversity. According to the results, a third reported either witnessing or experiencing religious bias first-hand. A total of 36 percent reported religious non-accommodation, such as dress codes disallowing religious garb, requiring work on religious holidays, or job sites not having a prayer or meditation space.

Close to half of all non-Christian respondents reported religious non-accommodation. The majority of respondents believed Muslims to be the group that faces the most discrimination in today’s society, even more so than homosexuals, racial minorities, and women.

A spokesman for the Council on American-Islamic Relations said, “Workplace discrimination is one of the largest categories (of bias) we see year to year.”

A report by the federal Equal Employment Opportunity Commission indicates that more than a fifth of all workplace bias complaints involve Muslims. This is highly disproportionate since Muslims make up less than two percent of the U.S. population.

The EEOC report says that although systemic discrimination has been dramatically reduced during the last few decades, religious discrimination still remains in the form of personal conflicts, such as offensive language and jokes.

Every employee is entitled to a safe and comfortable working environment, no matter what the occupation. There are laws established to guarantee this right, yet workplace discrimination is an ongoing issue. If you have faced or are currently experiencing religious, sexual, or racial discrimination at your place of employment, contact the experienced Washington employment law attorneys at Teller & Associates. We will thoroughly analyze the details surrounding your case and build a customized legal strategy to achieve a favorable outcome. To learn more about employment law and how it affects your case, call us today at (206) 324-8969.



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